The People Speak (‘Gay Suicide’ dialogue cont.) Part 2.

gay-teens-timeLast week I blogged on claims by advocates of redefining marriage, that there was a link between gay suicide and ‘not being accepted,’ so same-sex marriage was necessary. I said that was “reprehensible.”  Me ol’ mate long-distance runner and blogger David Farrar at Kiwiblog said that was “callous.”  The People spoke, a lot (128 commentaries) mainly agreeing with me. Here are some of their comments as a constructive continuance of this debate.

For background see:

9. Fletch (3,854) Says:  February 2nd, 2013 at 11:17 am
ps, will passing gay marriage laws bring the suicide rate by gays down? Not likely. As an example, Canada has had legalised gay marriage since 2005. Is suicide still a problem for gays there? Yes.

Here’s a quote from gay magazine Xtra in Canada, in a column by Julia Garro, dated Tuesday, February 17, 2009.

Over the past 10 years [Government] have contracted with experts on gay, lesbian, bisexual health to produce studies … issues affecting queer Canadians includes lower life expectancy than the average Canadian, suicide, higher rates of substance abuse, depression, inadequate access to care and HIV/AIDS… all kinds of health issues that are endemic to our community… higher rates of anal cancer in the gay male community, lesbians have higher rates of breast cancer … more GLBT people in this country who die of suicide each year than die from AIDS, there are more who die early deaths from substance abuse than die of HIV/AIDS… now that we can get married everyone assumes that we don’t have any issues … A lot of the deaths that occur in our community are hidden … Those of us who are working on the front lines see them and I’m tired of watching my community die.”

If there is a higher suicide rate among gays, it’s not because of the lack of gay marriage; nor, I would say, a lack of acceptance. Gays are more accepted now than at any time in history because of the prevalence of gays in movies, tv shows, presenters etc (thanks to liberal Hollywood).

Again, from their own literature, here’s part of a submission by gays to the Canadian Human Rights Commission, outlining some of their problems – 

Life expectancy of gay/bisexual men in Canada is 20 years less than the average; that is 55 years.
GLB people commit suicide at rates from 2 to 13.9 times more often than average.
GLB people have smoking rates 1.3 to 3 times higher than average.
GLB people have rates of alcoholism 1.4 to 7 times higher than average.
GLB people have rates of illicit drug use 1.6 to 19 times higher than average.
GLB people show rates of depression 1.8 to 3 times higher than average.
Gay and bisexual men (MSM) comprise 76.1% of AIDS cases.
Gay and bisexual men (MSM) comprise 54% of new HIV infections each year.
If one uses Statistics Canada figure of 1.7% of GLB becoming infected, that is 26 times higher than average.
GLB people are at a higher risk for anal cancers.

For the exact quotes, please see pages 3 and 4 of the HRC complaint HERE

As I’ve said before, do we really want to promote this kind of lifestyle to others (especially children) as being normal?

And to enshrine these relationships in law? To what end? Marriage is not a prize or a merit badge that you get as the conclusion of a relationship to say you’ve made it (although that’s what some seem to think of it as); it’s the beginning of something else – the start of a family; the rearing of children: THAT is why the Govt’s of the past took an interest in it, because they had an interest in supporting this building block of society; not some notion that marriage is there to affirm yours or my romance.

 

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About coNZervative

A blog about politics, life, culture, literature, music and thought from Christchurch, New Zealand [NZ] (the home of 10,000 earthquakes since 4 Sept. 2010) built because of the bullying and cajoling of Liberal opinion-makers (journalism and Hollywood) against conservative-minded people who are as entitled to opinion and a perspective as anyone; and because Conservativism has served the world well. John Stringer is a New Zealander (Christchurch) in his 40s married to an American from Taco Bell; they have 5 adult children in 3 diff. countries. John is an ex-Anglican pastor, a teacher, published author (NZ), novelist (USA) and cartoonist (Aust, NZ), and has spent the last 25 years in NZ politics with the National party (he was a parliamentary candidate in 1999). There was a stint in London working for the British Conservative party as well, where he did media minding and campaign work with several Brit cabinet ministers, including Baroness Thatcher, Baroness Blatch, Michael Howard, Tom King, among others. He has an MA (classical studies, Victoria); is a graduate of the New York Film Academy; and has various awards for writing. His passions include British bulldogs, fly fishing, and history (Ancient and WWII). Winston Churchill was mainly a “Conservative” but also a “Liberal” MP between 1900-1964. A Member of Parliament for 64 years, he contested 21 parliamentary elections (for Oldham, Manchester North West, Dundee, and Epping/Woodford). Throughout his career Churchill stood for liberty. He believed in open debate and freedom of speech, and opposed any system or ideology that tried to dictate the way one should think. Churchill felt deeply that disagreements within the democratic system should not degenerate into personal animosities. RIDER: This site is not connected to nzconservative, a Catholic site, or NZ Conservative Party, although from time-to-time I share some of the views espoused by both groups and other sites I follow, as published; I am an independent thinker and blogger.
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